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Have You Had Your Daily Dose of Editors?

The Boss decided to purchase a license to RubyMine for me to use, and the rest of the office to evaluate. I wanted to share my experiences, since there doesn’t seem to be a lot of real-world experience on developing Ruby on Rails in a corporate setting using RubyMine. Also, some of my new (and past) coworkers might be curiously looking over their screens with TextMate to see what else is out there.

First, a bit about the Ruby on Rails culture. It is a very Mac OS X oriented, and the preferred editor of choice is TextMate. I really try and stay away from tools that only run on one operating system, and TextMate falls into that category. Ruby is a very terse, dynamic and simple language. Rails developers will tell you that you don’t need an IDE to do Rails work. While this is true, I find not using anything more than a text editor is like using a screwdriver instead of a power tool. If you are a good developer, and you understand Ruby a good editor will only make you more productive. RubyMine isn’t meant to be relied on like IDEs are for other strongly typed languages including C# and Java. It makes a best effort to provide its features without getting in your way when it fails.

RubyMine offers full support on Windows, Mac and Linux. RubyMine also strives very hard to make the Windows version as strong as the *nix versions. It does this by including an IRB console, and commands to run many rake tasks, and Rails generators. While these tools are a very good solution on Windows, people with the ability to run a native terminal will probably find the offerings lacking in comparison. This review will skip these Windows-audience features, since I don’t feel it represents the majority.

Auto-Completion

RubyMine does a very good job at trying to autocomplete its code. It will look inside Class definitions, and can find methods, attributes, and associations. If you are using gems that extend classes, such as ActiveRecord, RubyMine will do a fairly robust job at reading these methods from the gem files once they are attached to the project. “Attached” just means that RubyMine is inspecting these gems. It was not able to locate gems provided via Bundler, but this is supposed to be coming. Also, the auto-complete can be slow at times and freeze the editor from further input.

Inline Documentation

When you place the caret over a method, or class, RubyMine will fetch the documentation for that method and show it in the editor. This is doesn’t always locate the documentation however, in cases where the method is defined in a gem that is unattached.

Command+Click Following

You can click class names, and method names to jump straight to the definition. Also useful is clicking on associations, and named scopes. You can also jump to route definitions, and partials.

Cucumber Integration

There is auto-complete provided for your Cucumber tests, however also nice is the Command + mouse over action of displaying the definition of a scenario step. These can be Command + clicked to follow to where the step is defined. Also, if your step does not match a definition, you will be notified in the editor.

Safe Refactoring

Refactoring in this sense is renaming a variable, or a filename. The nice part about RubyMine is the ability to optionally search your project for usages of the current variable, or filename and update those references, or just notify you about them.

Spelling

Not a big selling point, however many editors don’t offer strong spelling support. It checks your comments, and your variable names, but stays out of the way of your code.

Find By Filename / Class

You can pull up a dialog that will allow you to type a filename and it will return all matches regardless of directory level. Filenames can be regular expressions, and can include paths, and even line numbers. RubyMine will find them, and in the case of the line number, it will open the file and jump to that location. Searching by a class name is very similar.

Copy Buffer

Only having a clipboard with one item in it can be frustrating at times. Using the copy buffer feature, I can copy multiple sections of a file, then paste them individually later.

Code Formatting

RubyMine allows for manual formatting, or formatting on paste. You can also auto-format a complete document with a keystroke, based on your auto-format settings. It even works on HTML/ERB, HAML, Javascript, and CSS.

RubyMine isn’t a perfect tool however, and there are things about it that are less than ideal. Specifically, the footprint of RubyMine can be quite large. This seems to be a sin it shares with many of its Java IDE brothers. After watching it creep (unnecessarily) up to 400+ MB, I decided to do something about it. The solution turned out to be very simple.  On OS X, look for the file “Info.plist” in the /Applications/RubyMine 2.0.2.app/Contents/ directory. On Linux, change the file in the rubymine/bin/rubymine.vmoptions file. Change the value for Xmx to be 128m. This is the memory cap in which RubyMine will run. Runs like a charm now, and for days too.

Other annoyances include the default editor settings. Changing to soft tabs was more confusing than it should have been. Allowing “virtual space” after then of a line leads to a lot of accidental whitespace. The right gutter line isn’t helpful for Rails development. The font face was terrible. I had to customize the default theme to make it use the Apple default font. And finally, I don’t like the “Project” oriented state. I would rather open from within a directory in the terminal and work from there. I also don’t care for it generating a work folder within my Rails project – its just one more thing I have to pay attention to when using version control.

All in all, this is certainty one of the best editors I have seen yet for Ruby and Rails work, while I am sure I haven’t even scratched the surface of what this editor is capable of doing. It beats Netbeans 6.x, and RadRails. It will be interesting to see how Aptana Studio 3 turns out as the Aptana folks seem to really be putting some love into it. These editors felt like Ruby support was tacked onto what was intended to be a Java editor. The other end of the editor spectrum are hundreds of weak text-editors. I wanted something in-between. RubyMine has a clear focus, and all of its options center around Ruby and Rails work. So, if you are using TextMate as your first, and only Ruby on Rails editor, give yourself some perspective try out RubyMine’s free trial.

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3 thoughts on “Have You Had Your Daily Dose of Editors?

  1. @Stephen Open up RubyMine preferences, and go to Code Style -> General (or for the specific language you want to enable soft tabs for). Under the “Tabs and Indents” section, you can uncheck “Use tab character”, which implicitly means use spaces, or soft tabs. You can change the number of spaces below under “Tab size”.

    Good luck! Glad you are giving Rubymine a run

    Like

  2. It was the unchecking of the box that had me flustered. Thank you for your help.

    There are a lot I like about RubyMine but there are some things that are frustrating too. What you mentioned above rings true with the program. Thanks for the help cutting file size down too.

    Great advice!

    Like

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